wildlifewednesday

Northern Crescent Butterfly

Pearl Crescent Butterfly, Phyciodes tharos - Ellie Kennard 2016
Northern Crescent Butterfly, Phyciodes cocyta – Ellie Kennard 2016
Phyciodes cocyta

This is a common butterfly around here in the summer, but I was really pleased to get this photo of it as it rested on the path. The patterns on its wings are finely drawn and the tips of its antennae are tiny orange balls (hard to see in this photo, to be fair). Rupert (our Cornish Rex cat) tried to catch it and almost succeeded (which is what drew it to my attention) but I managed to save it and put it safely out of his reach (he is on a long leash) so it could get over the shock and fly away. Have a lovely week everyone, full of lovely butterflies!

 

Snake in the Sun

 

It's so wonderful to be able to go into the woods and just walk on the ground again! Most of the snow is melted and we don't need to pile on our warm clothes, boots, snowshoes and all the paraphernalia that a winter walk involves. It is so wonderfully freeing ! On this particular afternoon I almost trod on a snake, just caught myself from putting my foot down on it by grabbing onto +Linda Jess's arm, much to her horror as she has a pathological fear of the reptiles. That time the slender creature slithered away out of sight in the undergrowth at the side of the path before I could put my camera to my face. I was so cross to have missed that chance. After about 40 minutes or so we were walking back along the same trail and I spotted this one just lying in the path in the sun. He never moved no matter how much I walked around him, taking photographs in case he decided to make a run for it or moved myself to get in closer for a better view. He kept an eye on me, but didn't seem to be worried by our proximity nor by Joni who was waiting a little distance away. It was as if he was sitting for his portrait in his favourite environment. Did I see two snakes that day? Or was it the same one, overcoming his pathological fear of humans and hoping to get a closer look at us on our way back?

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#hqspanimals +HQSP Animals curated by +Alejandro J. Soto +Andy Smith
#wildlifewednesday by +Mike Spinak +Morkel Erasmus

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Hungry Snake

 

It's bitter cold today and no reptile would be moving around, so this is a summer memory. We had fun this past year meeting up with +Alex Lapidus and +Linda Villers and we spent the day sharing with them some of our favourite spots. On our walk to the Kejimkujik seaside adjunct, we spotted this fellow with a frog in his mouth. The frog was easily 4 times as wide as the snake and the back legs (from my memory) were being swallowed as the snake began to ingest his prey. I can't interpret the look on the face of any reptile, but I am pretty sure I saw panic in the eyes of that frog. As we came nearer, the snake was startled and relaxed its grip for a second. The frog struggled free and hopped off and the snake, disappointed and no doubt hungry, turned to make his own escape into the undergrowth beside the path.

For today's #wildlifewednesday by +Mike Spinak +Morkel Erasmus
and a little late for
#ReptileMonday +Reptile Monday by +Will Pirnasch +Nicole Best

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Beautiful and Elegant, Alert for Danger

 

I guess she didn't see me as a threat when we were stopped by her. This deer was in the woods in Ontario, not far from Arnprior, where we were visiting in November. She was very close to us and stood still long enough that I managed to get several photos of her. Deer always make me catch my breath with wonder and when I was younger, they could move me to tears when I saw them. They have such a beautiful grace and elegance for creatures of their size that I never fail to be delighted at the sight of them.

I hope you all have a wonderful weekend, filled with joy at the beauty that is around us in whatever part of the world we are.

Are you not able to comment on Google+ because you don't belong? Would you prefer to comment on my blog? It's right here with all my G+ posts on it: https://www.elliekennard.ca .

#hqspanimals +HQSP Animals curated by +Alejandro J. Soto +Krystina Isabella Brion +Andy Smith
with apologies for the late (or early) posting for #wildlifewednesday by +Mike Spinak +Morkel Erasmus

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(Probably) Immature Wood Duck

 

Until I learn otherwise, I am saying that it is probably an immature female wood duck, as identified by +Mike Goodwin and seconded by +Stephen Thackeray – thanks a lot you two! I will change the title once we are 100% sure.

Another young bird photographed on the same overcast rainy day in Miner's Marsh in August. I thought it was a young mallard, but I see more clearly now that it probably isn't, as there seem to be no photographs of mallards with white stripes around the eyes and the base of the bill is not the right colour. There are many wrong things about it (not wrong, of course, just wrong for mallard) in my thinking, so I am stumped here. My bird app has not come up with an answer. Can you?

If you can identify it I will amend the title with the species name and credit you with the identification! (Now there's incentive for you! 😉 – it can be a real claim to fame. LOL)

Are you not able to comment on Google+ because you don't belong? Would you prefer to comment on my blog? It's right here with all my G+ posts on it: https://www.elliekennard.ca .

#hqspbirds +HQSP Birds curated by +Suzi Harr +Mark Rayner +Andy Brown
#waterbirdwednesday +Water Bird Wednesday by +Margaret Tompkins
#webbywednesday +WebbyWednesday by +Celeste Odono
#wildlifewednesday by +Mike Spinak +Morkel Erasmus

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Immature Pied-Billed Grebe

 

I walked around the Kentville Miner's Marsh area a few weeks ago, on a dull day and managed to see quite a number of wildfowl, many of which were too far away to get decent photographs especially as the light was poor and it was windy. This youngster was swimming and diving not too far from the shore and I got several of him. I thought at the time that when he went underwater it was almost as if he didn't so much dive as simply submerge out of sight. Almost as if he sank underwater.

He was a little hard for me to identify and even another (much better) bird photographer didn't have any idea what he might be, looking at my photographs. I was a little disheartened (feeling that my images had not done the bird justice) until I found it on my bird identification app and the images of it were no better than this one. He looks very odd, quite like a clown as the article below says.

Today I found this information about the species, which is the second smallest grebe found in North America. http://ecobirder.blogspot.ca/2010/11/adventures-of-clown-duck.html

Are you not able to comment on Google+ because you don't belong? Would you prefer to comment on my blog? It's right here with all my G+ posts on it: https://www.elliekennard.ca .

#hqspbirds +HQSP Birds curated by +Suzi Harr +Mark Rayner +Andy Brown
#waterbirdwednesday +Water Bird Wednesday by +Margaret Tompkins
#webbywednesday +WebbyWednesday by +Celeste Odono
#wildlifewednesday by +Mike Spinak +Morkel Erasmus

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